Returning native species – where the government falls down

Perhaps not receiving the attention it should,  this week the Bega District news reported on the success of a long term, local ‘Bettong Breeding Project’. One of the offspring, named Nigel, has been donated to Potoroo Palace, to assist in educating people about ‘how important the bettong’s role is within the natural environment’.

In common with most attempts to return locally extinct species, the captive breeding project is a private initiative, undertaken by Rob High at the Mandeni resort near Merimbula.

Of course in an ideal world the major land managers, Forestry and the NPWS would also understand how important bettongs and other species are, and their respective roles within the natural environment.

Unfortunately, this understanding would seem to be dependent on a similar understanding of, and a desire to implement, the National Forest Policy statement.

 

HP3010-11

 

 

Confirming it has no interest, FCNSW have taken the time to respond to the complaint, regarding issues associated with logging in Bodalla state forest. I’ll respond eventually, as there are several issues, and there is no rush. However, one of the these is around FCNSW’s capacity to identify different ‘forest ecosystems’ and how this ability is constrained by the use of ‘forest types’.

According to FCNSW, ‘ known locations of mapped rainforest within compartment 3011 were identified . . . but not field verified’ during the last logging event, sometime around 2007, because it was believed to be within the filter strip. On this occasion the area was inspected, found not to be rainforest,  ‘was removed from the HPOM and documented in the FCNSW geographic information system (GIS)’.

As indicated in the forest type map above, the outcome turned the endangered ecological community, ‘River flat Eucalyptus forest’ into forest type 166, River peppermint. The claim that this area is within the filterstrip, doesn’t wash, so it seems likely it was logged in 2007.

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